The Great Unknowns: Albert Dorne

This is a series about great artists that you may not know about (If you're under 30 that is). Most of the artists I profile are dead, some are still kicking and doing amazing work. But they've long fallen out of the mainstream to make way for The Hot Artist. The great thing about the old guys/gals is that they are like a glass of cold water on a hot day. These people knew their craft, not Photoshop. They used brushes and quill pens to create their masterpieces. Their only undo button was a bottle of Pelican Opaque White and a steady hand.

Albert Dorne

One of my all time favourite artists, from the moment I laid eyes on his work. He has the facility of Normal Rockwell and is a better gesture artist to boot. Dynamic poses, solid forms, humour, amazing composition, perfect caricature. The man had it all. Including those crazy eyebrows. 

Albert Dorne

Albert Dorne

From Wikipedia: 

 (February 7, 1906 - December 15, 1965) was an American Illustrator.
 
He was born in the slums of New York City's East Side, and had a troubled childhood plagued with tuberculosis and heart problems. [1] He would cut classes to study art in the museums, eventually quitting school altogether to support his family. After numerous jobs such as managing a news stand and acting as an office boy[2], as well as a short professional boxing career, he began working in advertising. 
 
He apprenticed as a letterer with then-letterer and future prominent illustrator Saul Tepper before beginning a five-year stint at the commercial art studio of Alexander Rice. [3] He left the studio to begin a freelance career and soon his illustrations started appearing in such magazines as LifeCollier's and The Saturday Evening Post and by 1943 was featured on the cover of 'American Artist' magazine, recognized as 'one of the best and highest paid in the field of advertising illustration.'
 
In 1948 Dorne conceived the idea of a correspondence school for art, and recruited eleven other well-known artists and illustrators, including Norman Rockwell, to found the Famous Artists School.
 
In 1956, Dorne donated his pictorial resource file of over 500,000 items to the Westport Public Library. The collection is still in use today.

 

 UPDATE: You can follow my board on Pinterest for more artwork.